'Scooby Doo!' Isn't Much Fun, And Neither Are Those Meddling kids

'Scooby Doo!' Isn't Much Fun, And Neither Are Those Meddling kids

‘Scooby Doo!’ Isn’t Much Fun, And Neither Are Those Meddling kids

First of all, a confession: there are those of us who have never really been Scooby-Doo fans, or, for that matter, those children who have been intruding.

Scooby Doo!’ Isn’t Much Fun, And Neither Are Those Meddling kids
Despite spite of this, the cartoon dog and his crime-solving crew have been around for 50 years, which explains why there’s a movie called “Scoob!,” one that’s so inconsistent and bland it doesn’t lose much from having a TV screen premier.

Until coronavirus struck, “Scoob!” was intended for theatres.As studios strive to make the most of a bad situation and feed the demand for new material, it follows “Trolls World Tour”— which finds a receptive audience— in the family fare segment that streams into homes, offering a distraction for parents seeking to entertain children for 90-ish minutes, particularly if they can excuse themselves.

Aside from nostalgia, the biggest challenge for this animated film— missing the excitement of the live-action versions created in the early part of this century— is to lay a feature-length story over the bones of a formulaic cartoon on Saturday morning.

At least the film largely meets the challenge at that point, putting Shaggy (voiced by Will Forte) and Scooby (Frank Welker) at the core of a threat to the entire world, as they are whisked off by a superhero known as the Blue Falcon (Mark Wahlberg) on a major, messy aventure.

There is also a telegraphed message about the value of friendship, which checks the seemingly unshakeable bond between the central duo.

Directed by Tony Cervone, “Scoob!” attempts to take on a futuristic feel, with Simon Cowell’s cameo and references to stuff like Netflix and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg— the latter being chosen as her Halloween costume by the Scooby gang’s Thelma (Gina Rodriguez).

That’s about as inventive as things get, and beyond the improved computer animation compared to the hand-drawn origins, sequences worthy of attention are too few and very far between.

To be sure, “Scoob!” exists more in recycling than in reinvention— it’s more a snack than a meal— but it aims to make an old term new and hip again in the eyes of children.That might answer the question why the film exists, but on the basis of the performance, nothing merits an exclamation point here.

“Scoob!” is available for rent and purchase on request on 15 May.www.gistbux.com…

‘Scooby Doo!’ Isn’t Much Fun, And Neither Are Those Meddling kids

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here